Course Spotlight: Food and Society

Dr. Karen Metheny will teach Food and Society  (MET ML 712) on Thursday evenings during the fall 2017 semester, and has prepared this overview of the class.

»How do social institutions shape the way we think about food? Our ability to access food?

»How do work schedules and family dynamics shape or constrain the family meal?

»Do social classes and institutions affect the way we shop? The food we prefer?

In Food and Society, students will examine these kinds of questions and look specifically at how social groups, categories, and institutions shape, structure, or are structured by food-related practices. We will look at multiple contexts of food production, access, procurement, and consumption, including rural agricultural sites, urban homesteads, grocery shopping, CSAs, and food assistance programs. We will also examine the intersection of food practices with class, ethnicity, race, age, and gender.

We will engage in a range of exercises to explore methods (visual sociology, food chain analysis, surveys and questionnaires, interviews) that can be applied to a final research project. The research project offers students a wonderful opportunity to pursue in-depth analysis of key topics in food studies. A sample of past projects includes:

  • focused analysis of the role of ethnic food trucks as potential agents of taste expansion, authenticity, or cultural appropriation
  • food as cultural capital among millennials
  • a comparative study of Haymarket and Boston Public Market in the context of creating social well-being and a ‘sense of community’
  • the mission and sustainability of The Daily Table
  • the food landscape of Jamaica Plain
  • imagined kitchenspace
  • dinner on demand services as cultural capital
  • functional foods and grocery shopping through the lens of yogurt
foos and society
A sample from Gastronomy student Keith Duhamel’s project, “‘This Little Piggy Went to Market’: Developing a Sense of ‘Community’ under a Cosmopolitan Canopy.”

Students have utilized Pinterest, Snapchat and Instagram as sources of data, conducted surveys through Facebook, created photo essays and videos, and collected oral interviews to complete their projects. Students will also have the opportunity to hear from a number of area food scholars and activists, and we will work with Dr. Bob Cadigan from the Applied Social Sciences department to create and implement surveys and questionnaires. Hope to see you in class!

MET ML 712, Food and Society, will meet on Thursday evenings from 6:00 to 8:45 pm, starting on September 7, 2017. Registration information can be found here.

 

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